July 14, 2016

Some additional photos from Imola.

Look at that body-roll! Needs to be addressed.

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I love seeing these sorts of cars at tracks, as for me the mid to late 90s Super 2000 touring cars are some of the best looking and coolest race cars that have been produced to this day. This ex-touring car is now living the time attack life and I’m sure it’s a fantastic platform for a street based time attack machine. Luckily it was parked up and had most of its body panels removed giving me a chance to have a peek at some of the details.

The front has been nicely simplified and its all function! Scoops and ducts for the intake, radiator and brakes, and then a few attachment points for the front splitter. The radiator has been relocated to be right at the front of the car and actually looks a little smaller than the stock one.

The engine bay really is spectacular. The engine is incredibly low and rearward in the engine bay and it’s great to see how tidy they are. No unnecessary crap, just pure performance.
Because the engines were NA and the competition was incredibly fierce between manufactures, a lot of development is put into intake and exhaust design, resulting in an overwhelmingly big intake and plenum.

Due to the extensive lowering and 19″ wheels a lot of changes have been made to the chassis too, which you can see by all the welds present. Larger tubs, reinforced strut mounts and engine mounts and seam welds in lots of places.
I also like the removable and lightened front brace; this is something I would like to do on the Nissan.

Beautiful 2-piece discs and AP Racing calipers. Single lug nut for maximum awesomeness.

On to the interior and it’s all business. The driver sits very far back in the vehicle, almost behind the B-pillar with an extended steering wheel and dash. Floor mounted pedal box and of course, a sequential gearbox.

After finally completing (sort of) the Great Danton I was finally able to attend a round of the Time Attack Italian Championship, my first one this year and round 3 of the championship. This was always going to be a shakedown event to actually make sure the car runs ok and to ensure that all the new components are fitted and working correctly.

The day before the event I had quite a few things to sort out, most importantly a large water leak from the left side of the engine which ended up being one of the water heater coolant lines. I also had to drive the car down from Bergamo all the way to Imola so I was quite careful as it was all unknown, and I stopped a couple of times during the 3 hour trip to check fluids and so on.

This first image sums up my day quite nicely; a lot of time waiting for a session after fixing the car. I had some sort of problem during every session which meant that my actual running time on track was very limited. I would usually go out for about 2-3 laps and then find out I needed to come back in to fix it, by which point it was too late to reenter the session.

The first session I went out for about 5 laps and came back in thinking everything was ok but I had lost a nut from the power-steering pump and the belt was slipping.
In the second session all the water that was available in the sky decided to fall and the session was quickly red flagged. We were able to redo the session after it cleared but I quickly found out that I had lost a bolt on the exhaust and it was dragging.
On the third and final session before the Superlap I decided to actually push the car a bit now as I hadn’t had any chance to actually test the limits of the car and get to know the track a bit better. But at the end of the main straight on my first full power pass the splitter simply couldn’t hold on :D. At around 230km/h it ripped through the bumper and hit the ground. Luckily it had only a few grazes and was able to secure it again to the bumper with an improved mounting strategy but this wasn’t to be enough.

During the superlap on the first lap it once again came loose and started chattering. So I had to take it very cautiously around the lap and then on the second lap my car decided to have a fuelling issue, and that was the end of the day. My pace during the day wasn’t too far off the pack but at not point during the weekend was I pushing the car (posted a similar time to last year); hopefully I can get these issues sorted and hit the track again to actually see the improvements over last year.

Overall I’m actually very pleased with the day because all the issues were fairly minor and can be worked upon and the engine really went without a hitch. An engine I built completely from the ground up actually went pretty well, so it has been a huge learning experience.

Twin external wastegate F20C. Look at the size of the turbo in comparison to the engine.

GD V2 – Part 18

April 23, 2016

A bit overdue due to lack of time and I’ll keep it brief. Suspension system went back in after I remade some new brake lines; was then able to put the engine and transmission back in and begin remounting everything.

Rolled it out for the first time in about 5 months! You can also see my ‘new’ old Lexus GS300 as the BMW (feeling sorry for itself in the back) broke. Will fix that once the Great Danton is finished.

Plumbed the new oil system in with the remote filter mount and hooked up the oil cooler. Will be running a oil temp sensor in the filter block.

Looking so much better now!

JDMilano Squad 2016-04-07

April 10, 2016

GD V2 – Part 9

February 7, 2016

Progress finally continues after a few busy weeks moving house. I’d taken the cylinder head and crank to work at Christmas so I could continue the engine work in Switzerland, and utilise their specialist tools to complete the job.

The head is now completely disassembled. It was great to learn how to dismantle a head and a lot easier that I had believed to be honest. It is now packed up, together with the block and front chain cover to be sent to be cleaned; the cylinders will then get their walls honed.

As the engine will now be out of my hands I’ve been carrying on with the chassis. The front suspension and brakes are coming off to access the strut towers for some repair. It will also allow me to replace the steering track rod and toe ends.